Report: Smartphones Account For 50% Of Current Handset Sales in Japan

Goodbye, Galakei feature phones: according to Tokyo-based market research firm BCN (published in The Nikkei today), smartphones accounted for 49.8% of the total number of handsets sold between December 13 and 19 in Japan.

Sure, this is just a snapshot, but there is a clear tendency to be observed here, and the smartphone segment in Japan grows much faster than many people expected. By way of comparison: in January the ratio of smartphones to total handset sales stood at around 10%.

In November, 35.5% of all handsets sold in Japan were smartphones, with almost all domestic makers saying they will boost their smartphone production (and globalization efforts) in the near future that month. The most prominent examples are Sharp and Panasonic, with big P expecting smartphones to account for 75% of total sales by 2015.

In a separately published outlook, Nomura Research Institute today said that in 2015, handset sales in Japan will grow 43% to 45.7 million between 2010 and 2015. Nomura sees smartphones accounting for 70% of the total in five years.

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Dr. Serkan Toto is a German based in Tokyo. Like us, he is passionate about introducing Japanese IT to the rest of the world. Full-time, Serkan works as an independent web industry consultant for hedge funds, venture capital companies and start-ups worldwide. He is also a writer for mega tech blog network TechCrunch, covering Japan-related technology and web trends. This is Serkan's website. Follow Serkan on Twitter here.

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Serkan Toto

Dr. Serkan Toto is a German based in Tokyo. Like us, he is passionate about introducing Japanese IT to the rest of the world. Full-time, Serkan works as an independent web industry consultant for hedge funds, venture capital companies and start-ups worldwide. He is also a writer for mega tech blog network TechCrunch, covering Japan-related technology and web trends. This is Serkan's website. Follow Serkan on Twitter here.